Marking a Quilting Pattern with Press'n Seal

Sometimes it is difficult to see through a very thick fabric such as felted wool or a quilt that has already been sandwiched with the batting and backing. This makes tracing a quilting pattern onto the quilt very difficult. Using Press'n Seal (which is available in the grocery) simplifies this process.




First trace the quilting pattern onto the Press'n Seal with a fine tip permenant marker such as Pigma Pen size .05 and let the ink dry.




Then place this traced pattern onto the quilt in the desired location and finger press in place. Lower the feed dogs on your machine and use a darning foot to free motion quilt along all the lines of the quilting pattern.




After all the stitching has been finished; tear away the Press'n Seal leaving only the stitched quilting. In this photo I have started to remove some of the Press'n Seal. I use my fingernail to scratch at the Press'n Seal or sometimes I use tweezers to help pull off the pieces of the Press'n Seal.

Please leave me a comment if you find this technique helpful. Let me know if there is another technique you would like to see featured.

This post is a followup to my Felted Wool Applique tutorial posted on June 9, 2011 at http://stashmanicure.blogspot.com This was a very popular tutorial with 133 comments posted so far. Thanks everyone!

64 comments:

  1. I do this same thing, but I use white tissue paper. You get a ton of it for 88 cents and it tears away nicely behold it is not clear, it IS translucent enough to place appropriately on your quilt.....but this is a neat idea too!

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    1. How do you keep it in place so you can quilt accurately?

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    2. Press n seal has a slightly sticky backing that will adhere to almost anything, but just peels off cleanly

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    3. Press n seal has a slightly sticky backing that will adhere to almost anything, but just peels off cleanly

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    4. great idea!! I'll try it! We were in Nova Scotia last November. It is a beautiful country. People very nice.

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  2. Beautiful felted wool quilt. Thanks for sharing you ideas.

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  3. Try using the shop vac or the attachment hose of your vacuum to remove the paper - I use my vac hose with no attachments to remove stray threads and quilting paper (with the design traced) from my quilt top before rolling the quilt to the next section on the long arm frame. I have the ruler base on my machine so there's a little table, I use the edge of the vac hose to abrade the paper slightly and break the paper apart at the needle perforations, then use the vac on it. Sucks that paper right off the quilt. I still need to tweeze some little bits out with a fine tipped tweezers. I vac, tweeze, vac again and go over the quilt one more time, might be a couple more pieces that need tweezed away. But still way faster than tearing the paper away by hand.

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  4. LOVE this idea! Thanks for sharing!

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  5. Doesn't it leave a bit of black from the ink under your stitches. Can you get it ALL out?

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    1. I have the same question. It seems like some of the black could be trapped under the stitches. I would do a sample first and see how that goes.

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  6. Esse papel é tipo um papel manteiga????ou wax paper?
    \obrigado!!!
    liége

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    1. Não é não... É um tipo de plástico que gruda na superfície de qualquer coisa é desgruda muito fácil sen deixar vestígios algun. Geralmente usado na cozinha.

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  7. I tried this but am having trouble getting it off over top of the stitches, any suggestions?

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  8. Going to try this today, thanks for taking the time to post.

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    1. Try to shorten stitch length. It works well with paper. Mightdothe trick

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  9. Interesting technique. I will be looking for Press and Seal on my next trip to the grocery store. I like the idea of it holding fast to the fabric.

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  10. I hand stitch my quilts and wonder if this would work for removing the press and seal paper without damaging any stitches?

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  11. I tried this long ago with my longarm and had two problems...
    1. some of the ink transferred to the quilt (I think this was due to how hot the needle gets).
    2. It was a real pain in the patootie to get rid of all of the press and seal after quilting. I sat there with a pair of tweezers for a very long time.
    It may work better with a domestic sewing machine.

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    1. I do this but I use a pencil not ink. Yes it is a bit tedious to have to take out the paper. I use tracing paper. It is so much easier than drawing on your quilt and running the risk your marker does not come off. I use a long arm also.

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    2. No, it doesn't work better on a small machine. I tried this and then spent a LONG time picking out the little bits of plastic! Good idea, but not for me!

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  12. Haven't tried it yet; but will! Thanks for posting.

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  13. I have used this in the past with great success. I try to use a marker just a couple of shades darker than the fabric because the black does migrate sometimes. I also discovered by accident that hovering a hot iron close to the surface - or on if you are brave ) actually dissolves the last of the plastic and there don't seem to be any fumes to deal with either. A great method to add to you marking repertoire.

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  14. I use wax paper to make my quilting patterns. You can scratch the design on the wax paper and so when you stitch no ink transfers thru to the quilt. Removal is fairly easy and if you mist the paper first then it comes away very easily.

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  15. Great Idea, a lot cheaper than using water soluable stabelizer.
    Thanks.

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  16. has anybody tried netting or tulle?

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    1. I saw a video using tulle in an embroidery hoop. I tried it but it was very hard to draw a pattern on the tulle and I finally gave it up and created a plastic stencil using a soldering iTunes. Good luck with it.

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  17. I tried this with tissue paper. In a tighter pattern it is awful getting the paper out. It would be okay with a large looped pattern like the one shown.

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  18. I use Press & seal all the time to transfer embroidery designs onto my fabric love it

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  19. I just tried this using Gutterman thread, size 14 needle FMQ on my Janome 9500. The thread kept breaking, seemed to hang up in the (don't know if this is correct termanology) draw up section of the threading guide. Any suggestions?
    Jeannette

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  20. Try using a lint roller...or roll clear packing tape around your hand. It goes pretty quickly for me.

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  21. Thank you ! I have some and will give it a go. I have 2 quilts waiting lots of FMQ'ing....

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  22. I did try this but found gunk on my needle almost immediately. :(

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  23. I tried a variety of papers recently to see what I liked best. The press and seal was easy to draw on, adhered nicely and was good to stitch through, but removing it from the stitching was awful. My favourites were tracing or parchment paper by far. Freezer paper left loose stitching, probably because it was thicker and I didn't like wax paper as well either.

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  24. I have tried this method and found it far too tedious (and sometimes downright impossible) to get all the Press 'n Seal off. I now use a stencil and a pounce pad where the chalk removes easily when you run your iron over it - easy peasy!

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  25. Tried it and a heck of a mess to get out, over the stitches and coloured the stitches black! So now I use washaway, a bit of water and it washes off

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  26. For those using tracing paper, you can stitch over the design with your machine needle (no thread), prior to applying it to the quilt and paper removal will be much easier.

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  27. Hello Rosemary, Oh my goodness . . . this is brilliant and I can not wait until my next trip to the grocery store to buy some and give this a try. I found your blog on Pinterest and do not see a place to follow, so I'm adding you to by Favorite Blog List.
    I'm so happy to meet you!
    Your new blogging sister,
    Connie :)

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  28. I use a piece of clear packing tape to remove the press and seal. I press the tape over the completed quilting, go back and forth a couple of times so it's really stuck well to the press and seal and then rip it off as if I was waxing my legs, fast and hard. It works great!

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  29. I use a piece of clear packing tape to remove the press and seal. I press the tape over the completed quilting, go back and forth a couple of times so it's really stuck well to the press and seal and then rip it off as if I was waxing my legs, fast and hard. It works great!

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  30. Thanks for the hints every one ,I have not machine quilted yet I'm going to try and see if I can

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  31. I find the yellow thin paper from Golden threads to work much better than Press an Seal. It is a very fine paper. Really easy to remove. No Plastic to be left on you quilt. I little more expensive but so worth it.

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  32. This looks lika a good technique for applique as well-just leave a small area where you can pull the plastic out from underneath before finishing a closed area.

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  33. Just recently I used permanent pen and it also transferred through to the fabric. I was able to remove the marking pen with isopropyl alcohol. Was really pleased with the outcome as the markings were totally removed. Phew!!!

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  34. This looks like a great technique and I will give it a try. Thanks
    Pauline
    perry94022 at hotmail dot com

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  35. I tried this and my thread would shred after 6-10". Changed needle, tension, threads and still shread. What do you recommend?

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  36. I tried this and my thread would shred after 6-10". Changed needle, tension, threads and still shread. What do you recommend?

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  37. I too had skipped stitches and shredding of the thread. I think the tissue paper idea would prevent these problems.

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  38. It never amazes me the great ideas that continue with time to come forward making our craft easier and more fun. Thanks for all the tips and ideas from everyone because now when I try this method I will take them into consideration: a lighter pen not black for marking my design. After stitching, remove Stretch and Peel, then use clear packing tape, pressing firmly on to quilt top, then ripping off firmly and quickly to remove ant remaining Press and Seal residue. What would my two quilting inspirations, Great Aunt Doll and Georgia have thought? Thrilled I am sure.

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  39. The pen comes through and bleeds on the thread. Anyone else have that problem? Good it was a practice piece

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  40. Instead of permanent marker on the Press and Seal wrap, I would use a FiXion erasable pen. They come in all colors and a hot iron removes it beautifully so if it would somehow transfer on to your quilt, it will come out with an iron or even friction.

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    1. I have some marker tip style frixon pins. I will be hand quilting so I'll try it that way. Good tips all round, even the negatives...we need to know those too.

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  41. Did anyone solve the issue of thread shredding?

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  42. I usually print out my pattern on regular typing paper, then add layers of paper and sew over the image with an in-threaded, old needle to make copies of the pattern. The paper has a tendency to dull my needle, that's why I use an old needle. The pattern is easy to remove. However, I think next time I'll try this same technique with tissue paper in layers. That way I can get more copies of the pattern and less wear and tear on my machine.

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  43. Love all these shared comments & tips. We quilters are The Edison's of invention! Thank you so very much every one.

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  44. I have really enjoyed this tutorial and found the comments fascinating. I have never quilted like this and can't wait to give it a try. Thank you everyone.

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  45. Great tutorial. Do you know if it will work with hand quilting?

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  46. Use Crayola Ultra Washable markers.

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